Be A Fan of Shreveport-Bossier

SBCTB_BeAFanOfShreveportBossier_PhotoPost_02

In celebration of National Travel and Tourism Week – May 1 -7, 2016, I invite you to Be a Fan of Shreveport-Bossier (SB). I am a super fan of SB, and love spreading the word about all of cool things to do in this area. In case you didn’t know, Shreveport-Bossier is home to a horseracing track, six casinos, 45 family attractions, and 50 annual events. I cringe when I hear someone say “there’s nothing to do here”, it is soooo not true.

Check out the video below for my top picks in SB Outdoor Adventures:

Whether you live in SB or have plans to visit, Shreveport-Bossier is filled with museums, festivals, art galleries, indoor and outdoor adventures that will keep you busy for hours. The Shreveport-Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau, and KSLA, has teamed up with SB attractions to offer some super-fabulous, exclusively deep discounts available only during Travel and Tourism week. All you have to do is register your email address at BeAFanOfSB.com. Nearly 20 discounts are being offered as part of the “Be a Fan of Shreveport-Bossier” campaign. When you sign up to receive the discounts, you will also be automatically entered to win a “staycation” package including a hotel stay at Hilton Garden Inn/Homewood Suites in Bossier City, 2016 family 4-pack to Splash Kingdom, a $50 gift certificate to Jan’s River Restaurant, as well as a family 4-pack of tickets to Sci-port Discovery Center, a family 6-pack to Holiday Lanes and more.

You can help spread the word too by sharing your photos and experiences on social media with the hashtag #BeAFanofSB.

Here are some useful websites to help you stay engaged:

That Just Happened!!
Robin Williams
Marketing Maven, Holiday Lanes

National Travel and Tourism Week, a project of the U.S. Travel Association, was established by a congressional resolution in 1983. This week of events serves to champion the power of the tourism and hospitality industry. For more information on National Travel and Tourism Week, visit www.ustravel.org.

Screen Shot 2016-04-25 at 4.06.35 PM

Print your #BeAFanOfSB coloring sheet

Get Some Validation on your Culinary Skills

12705177_10207155779705992_4238448262698544183_nI often wish that I were a culinary artist. It’s not that I totally love the idea of cooking every night or even every other day. I just like having the feeling of accomplishment when I create a beautiful meal, and of course then get to eat it. A few months ago I attended my first “Cook the Book: Ducasse Made Simple” cooking class at Sainte Terre with Chef Holly Moore Schreiber. The class series is based on the books that Chef Holly has personally worked on while working at the French Culinary Institute, testing and translating the recipes for publication in the United States. I have since also attended the “Cook the Book: David Chang’s Momofuku” class.

Chef Holly is this amazing Kate Middleton look-a-like, super charming, bright-eyed and always smiling creature that also just happens to be a humble culinary genius. From the moment I walked into that first class, she transferred her knowledge about food in such a validating way. Foie Gras and Lobster Newberg became “easy peasy” creations that I could actually tackle. I learned that my knife skills, while not as accurate as hers, were adequate enough to cut onions, carrots, and squash for a french Pascal Veggie tartlet. At my second class, I won’t say I mastered the ability to make ramen from scratch, but I indeed can say that I have experienced having my hands in the dough. Bacon Dashi? Yep, been there, done that. Chef Holly definitely gives me all the validation I need on my culinary skills.

12743580_10207200513384306_4740151207522502442_nSo now, I am excitedly awaiting the “Cook the Book: Dumplings All Day Wong” class on March 24. An event devoted to making any kind of Dim Sum that you can dream up.  I got a fortune the other day and I do believe Po is trying to tell me something here.

So I can already hear you. “How can I get tickets?”. Well unfortunately, the dumpling class is SOLD OUT . . . BUT, maybe, fortunately for you, I have one ticket that is up for grabs!

And, how do you WIN THE GIVEAWAY?

One lucky That Just Happened blog reader will receive a ticket to “Cook the Book: Dumplings All Day Wong” compliments of Sainte Terre. Simply go to SAINTE TERRE’S EVENT PAGE, check out their upcoming events and post which event you are most interested in, in the comments section of this blog below.  Winner will be announced on Monday, March 21, 2016 at around noon.

To learn more about Sainte Terre:

That Just Happened!!
Robin Williams
Marketing Maven, Holiday Lanes

 

IMG_7590UPDATE 3/21/16 – Amy Rich, you are the winner of the FREE ticket to Cook The Book: Dumplings All Day Wong! I will send you a message with the details. Congrats!

 

Feigning Blindness

blackLet me begin by saying that being blind is no joke. For an evening, I feigned blindness for the sake of learning.  As I was thinking of catchy blog titles and things to say, all of the “eye opening” references came to mind. But after the experience, I realized quickly that those silly little comments are not as funny as I originally thought. Imagine only seeing darkness, not being able to see the sun, or your child’s face when they are born. Think about how it would be not to see the food that you are eating.

The Louisiana Association for the Blind (LAB) presented “Dining in the Dark” at Superior Steakhouse in Shreveport, Louisiana on February 27, 2016. The fundraising event was meant to benefit the residents of Northwest Louisiana who live with severe vision impairment. LAB was established in 1927 and provides jobs, as well as training and services for people of all ages with low vision blindness. They employ people with vision impairment through four different divisions: LAB IndustriesAbility PrintingAbilityOne Base Supply Centers, and the Low Vision Rehabilitation Center.  The dining experience was also a way to raise awareness and understanding of what it is like to dine without vision. While dining is not the only challenge that people with blindness have to overcome, it is an opportunity to share a small sampling of the skill learning that LAB offers.

On a side note, I’ve worn glasses since the fifth grade. Well . . . “worn” may be stretching it. I’ve been “prescribed” glasses since the fifth grade. Because of my vanity I didn’t wear them with consistently, and then I started to drive. I realized that I must do something, so I got contacts until 2009 when I had PRK surgery to correct my distance vision. As a kid, I’m not sure why, but I would challenge myself by walking around my house with my eyes closed so that I would be able to find my way around if I ever became blind. I also would close my eyes in restaurants thinking that I could sharpen my hearing. I’ve always thought that I would be able to manage if ever became blind. This event proved me to be full of nonsense.

IMG_7014As my boyfriend Ed, and I approached the table, we immediately saw aprons and eye masks at each place setting. Not just any eye masks, but really swanky, light blocking masks with room for your eyes to blinks. I assumed that was so you would have the ability to keep your eyes open during the experience, while maintaining visual impairment. In the printed program, we found “tips and tricks” for successful dining. We’d need to rely on our other senses and abilities, introduce our table mates, imagine a typical place setting, keep contact with the table, and tips for using utensils and drink ware.  What you need to know about me is that I go all in when I participate in events. Once my mask went on, there would be no peeking, so I ran through the tips and got ready to start eating blindly.

Several times during the meal, I was aware that some people at my table had lifted their masks for a peek here and there. I totally get that this was a fun experiment and that not everyone would take it as a serious learning lesson like I had. In fact, at one point I was told that many of the people in the room had already taken off their masks to eat. I realized that I had to keep my mask on. People with low vision don’t get to turn their vision on and off. For just a few hours, I wanted to be immersed in what it felt like and as I sat at the table blindfolded, here are only a few of the things that I felt and thought:

  • Body Language: Body language cues aren’t there to pick up on how verbal expressions land. This alone can make everything more difficult. “Did I say something inappropriate?” “Is that why everyone stopped talking?”
  • I felt isolated: Again, with no visual clues as to when it’s appropriate to speak, I found myself listening and being less engaged in the conversation.
  • Time moves slower: Waiting on the wait staff to deliver food seemed to take an enormously long time. Engaging with dining partners to fill the time is a bit of a challenge when sight is not involved. 
  • Trust issues: I can imagine trust issues must be magnified when visually impaired. I trusted the wait staff when they said my wine was at my 1:00 and my plate was set up with certain foods at the 6:00 position. 
  • Spatial Relations: Navigating spatial relation is tough. I bumped into my waiter twice when he was setting food in front of me. It made me more conscious that I, as a sighted person, want to be more respectful of a visually impaired person’s personal space.
  • IMG_7019-1Self-consciousness, vanity and confidenceMy normal self-consciousness would be challenged if I ever became blind. I noticed as I was sitting at the table I didn’t have much control over what my hair looked like or if my décolletage was exposed. I dropped my salad fork before I ever started eating, and my confidence was not very high that I would be successful in feeding myself.
  • Relationships: Being in a relationship with someone would be based on less superficial exchanges. I heard Edward in a very new and different way. His voice inflections and pauses became more important without seeing his facial expressions. I wondered how I would have even met him if I had not first seen him and then to know what he looked like. I tried the cliché Helen Keller movie version of touching his face and I realized that being able to see a person is way different than relying on the shapes on their face. At one point, Ed and I exchanged a kiss, which was a bit difficult, but also way more hands on, so maybe that was ok.
  • Hearing differently: I was more aware of slight accents, voice changes, and pauses in conversations. As we were dining, I noticed one of the other attendees at our table had an accent that I hadn’t noticed prior to blindfolding. It was helpful in beginning a conversation with him about where he was born.
  • People are really loud: Several voices in the room seemed to be on speaker volume. It made me think that I want to be more aware when I speak in public. It also made me realize that all my practice as a kid did no good for me. All of the sounds in the room were intensified and I had a hard time just being able to hear the people at my table.
  • Smelling: I could smell and identify the food before it arrived. That was almost a comfort. I couldn’t see what I was eating, but I trusted my waiter to tell me what was on my plate. My sense of smell helped me trust what he said. 
  • Eating: I found out, and was proud of the fact, that I was pretty darn good with a fork and knife. I decided that I would still need to go to Weight Watchers if I ever became blind, but how would that work? Many of our eating habits are based on seeing our food. I cleared my plate, but to be sure, I asked my server and she confirmed that I did.
  • Impairment: Drinking while visually impaired is a double whammy. By the time my 3rd course arrived, I had two glasses of champagne and almost 3 glasses of wine. The combination of being visually impaired and intoxicated was quite problematic.
  • Social Media: Anyone who knows me knows that I have a slight social media addiction. I like snapping photos, posting on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn. Not once during my meal did I pick up my phone. I knew if I did that I would be inclined to peek through my mask and I wanted to get the full experience of what it would be like if I were blind. It also reminded me that the visually impaired have to rely on experiential memories rather than visual memories. 
  • Visual impairment is not the worst thing: The thought that kept occurring to me was that people with visual impairments have to learn to adjust and do more during just one meal than I have to do all day long. 

The “Dining in the Dark” experience was enjoyable, made me appreciative that I have sight, and more aware of the challenges that the visually impaired face each day. I am so glad to have been exposed to LAB and the services that they offer to those who have become blind or of low vision. They are providing opportunity and support to those in our communities who without it may be left in a situation of despair. I’d encourage you to take care of your eyes, and remember the Louisiana Association for the Blind in the event that you or someone you know ever needs their services.

To learn more about The Louisiana Association for the Blind:

That Just Happened!!
Robin Williams
Marketing Maven, Holiday Lanes

IMG_7012

 

 

Remington Suite Hotel and Spa

I was given an opportunity to tour The Remington Suite Hotel and Spa. A historic hotel in the heart of downtown Shreveport, Louisiana.

If you’re looking for a place to host a meeting, party, wedding or any special event, may I suggest The Remington Salon and Spa? It’s the only boutique hotel in Shreveport-Bossier and just an absolutely fabulous historic building that will give your event new life. Also, if you have family or colleagues coming in town, be sure to reserve a room here. They will not be disappointed. AND don’t forget about stay-cations for yourself! I am looking forward to staying sometime soon.

Call my friend Emerie Eck Gentry at (318) 425-5000 to book group events.

To learn more about The Remington Suite Hotel and Spa:

That Just Happened!!
Robin Williams
Marketing Maven, Holiday Lanes

How to find inspiration in Shreveport-Bossier (and a Giveaway)

FullSizeRender-1Do you have something that makes you cringe when you hear it? Something that drives you to roll your eyes and stomp your feet? I sure do. When I hear the phrase “there’s nothing to do in Shreveport-Bossier, Louisiana” I have to restrain myself from completely wigging out. You see, when I first moved to Shreveport-Bossier, I will admit that I said it myself. I moved here from South Louisiana and I really just wanted to go home. For many years, I went to work and then headed straight to my house. On occasion, I looked to the arts and entertainment section of the newspaper to find things that might be of interest to my family. I didn’t know many people that could help connect me to the community, so I just stayed home. That was then. And now, I subscribe to the thought that there are things to do wherever you may be.

Somewhere along the way I found out that if I wanted to be connected to a community, I first needed to leave my house, and secondly, I had to put some effort in on my part. I kind of had to be a researcher in my own life. I started, uncomfortably and awkwardly, attending events. I visited tourist welcome centers to find attractions located in Shreveport-Bossier. I scoured the newspapers to find events. I asked people what was going on in town. As the internet became more ingrained in my life, Googling and Facebook events became the go-to places for my inspiration. These are all fantastic ways to get information, and I will maintain that flow, but my favorite way to get the SB scoop is through the Shreveport-Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau’s (SBCTB) newly redesigned website Shreveport-Bossier.org. Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 3.36.00 PMThis website has been around for a while and was already one of my go-to sites, and in particular, the SB Fun Guide link that holds the events page. Today the SBCTB unveiled a redesign of the website with a celebratory launch party at Great Raft Brewing. SBCTB President Stacy Brown gave an introduction to area partners and shared some of the new features of the website. With the redesign, there is so much inspiration and a resource for both locals and tourism visitors. What you will find out is that Shreveport-Bossier has more to do than you can even imagine.

What can you expect to find on the site?  Maps, brochures, photo and video galleries, trip advisor and social media integration, geo-triggers for coupons and events, and itinerary planning:

  • CASINOS – gaming, night life and horse racing
  • THINGS TO DO – Attractions, shopping, family fun, sports, nightlife, group experiences and outdoor recreation. Be sure to click on the Attractions Link to see the multitude of experiences such as performing arts, museums, art galleries and historic places. There is also a great link for free offerings!
  • EVENTS – Festivals, music and annual events – <<<< This is one of my favorite parts of the site because it hosts the SB FUN GUIDE, which is the event driven piece
  • RESTAURANTS – food and drinks!
  • HOTELS – where to stay
  • MY TRIP – a personal trip planner to build an itinerary for a visit to the big SB

Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 10.06.05 AMIn my job at Holiday Lanes, I have become active in the SB Attractions Association and am currently serving as president of the association. One of my personal goals is to share local event information with as many people as possible in the community. First, I’m asking my attraction/hotel/restaurant/travel industry colleagues to BE AWARE that you can UPDATE your venues on the newly designed site; and ADD events to the SB Fun Guide. For the event driven page to be successful, it will take input from those who are planning, marketing or hosting local events. The SB Fun Guide is also undergoing redesign and will hopefully be launched next week (Feb 2016). Secondarily, I want this site to be top-of-mind for locals and visitors when looking for inspiration for things to do in Shreveport-Bossier.  Chris Jay, social media and public relations manager of the SBCTB, says that he is super excited that the new site will allow easy and quick uploading of featured events which will showcase partners, whether they are festivals, restaurants or attractions. Ideally, a venue would like to promote for several weeks, or months, prior to an event, but being able to make changes in a matter of minutes will be transformative for local tourism partners who might find themselves in need of a last-minute promotional boost.

So . . . how do you find inspiration in Shreveport-Bossier?

And, how do you WIN A GIVEAWAY?

One lucky That Just Happened blog reader will receive Bowling for Six people from Holiday Lanes. Simply go to Shreveport-Bossier.org, find the attractions link and locate the Holiday Lanes link on the site. Paste the Holiday Lanes Attraction page link in the comments section below AND THEN tell me which part of the Shreveport-Bossier.org website gave you a bit of inspiration. Winner will be announced on February 17, 2016.

Panderina Soumas and David Doe, local ambassadors and SB visitor guide cover models share a smile at the website Launch Party.

Other ways to connect with the Shreveport-Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau:

That Just Happened!!
Robin Williams
Marketing Maven, Holiday Lanes

 

2/17/16 – CONGRATS Bill McGill – you are the winner of a bowling certificate for six to Holiday Lanes!

 

Let’s welcome Barney’s Police Supplies to Bossier City

Congrats to Barney’s Police Supply on their Bossier Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cutting.

Barney’s Police Supply is located at 1701 Old Minden Rd #25, Bossier City, LA 71111. (318) 584-7093

Follow them

That Just Happened,
Robin Williams
Marketing Maven, Holiday Lanes

There is Hope in Collaboration

IMG_1161It is so easy to get caught up in our worries and feel like nothing is good in life. I’ve been feeling a bit down lately and it can be consuming. Today I was reminded that while my worries may be valid, there is always someone out there who has things a little (and a lot) worse. My friend, Candace invited me to tour HOPE for the Homeless, a.k.a. HOPE Connections Drop-In-Center, which is a collaboration of organizations and individuals dedicated to ending homelessness in Northwest Louisiana. Candace is a member of the board for the Volunteers of America North Louisiana (VOA) and she wanted to share how they are partnering with other agencies to provide hope in our community.

The Vision of HOPE for the Homeless is that no individual or family has to experience homelessness in Northwest Louisiana.

IMG_1155I really had no idea what to expect. What I found was so touching. The Drop-In-Center is truly a place of collaboration from over 60 agencies that work together to provide a safe resting place and resource center for the homeless.

IMG_1154IMG_1158IMG_1162What I understand about the challenges of being homeless and trying to obtain help is that navigating the system can be daunting, partly due to the travel distance between agencies. This Center provides shower facilities, laundry facilities, telephones, computers, mail receipt, medical services, and job opportunities. It is run by certified Peer Support Specialists that steer clients towards services that will help them obtain and maintain permanent housing.

IMG_1166What touched me most was hearing from Tony. Tony is a homeless veteran who landed in Shreveport after some set-backs in life. Tony, was resistant to accepting help because he has a dog, Obi Wan Kenobi (a three-legged sweetie). Tony had been offered help from other agencies, but with stipulations that he had to get rid of Obi. This was not an idea open for discussion with Tony. As an animal lover, I understand not wanting to give up the companionship. When the case worker from HOPE for the Homeless assured Tony that they would find a way to help them both and then followed through on that assurance, a trust relationship was formed. Because of the collaborations of several agencies, hope was given to Tony in a way that has allowed for a transition into a safer living situation. It has also given Tony a way to contribute back to the community.

HOPE Connections is located at 2350 Levy Street in Shreveport, LA. I hope you will consider taking a tour of this facility, or one of other VOA tours available. The collaborative efforts being made in our community are outstanding. Upcoming tours dates are as follows:

  • Sept 2, 2015 – 11 am – Ballington Center at South Pointe Place – 1133 South Pointe Parkway, Shreveport
  • Sept 2, 2015 – 4 pm – Highland Center – 520 Olive Street, Shreveport
  • Oct 7, 2015 – 11 am – Lighthouse Bossier – 2101 Scott St, Bossier City
  • Nov 4, 2015 – 11 am – Veterans Facility – 453 Jordan St., Shreveport
  • Dec 2, 2015 – 11 am – Lighthouse – 802 Travis St, Shreveport

Want more information about Hope for the Homeless or VOA?

IMG_1156

IMG_1159

IMG_1149

IMG_1160

IMG_1164IMG_1166

There is hope in collaboration! I’m proud to live in an area where there are people that are working to improve the lives of everyone in the community.

That Just Happened!!
Robin Williams
Marketing Maven, Holiday Lanes

* Source: http://nwlahope.org/ and site visit

We Drank the Harvest

 Four slow-food minded cocktail crafters competed at Drink The Harvest: A Craft Cocktail Competition event sponsored by Slow Food North Louisiana in hopes of walking away with the big win.

The New Levee Serenaders set the mood for the dancing couples

The event was held at Sainte Terre, a spectacularly gorgeous event venue in Benton, LA.  A tasting menu by Chef Holly Moore Schreiber was paired with each cocktail.

Competitor: Albert Eiffes, serving his Shrossierac

Competitor: Brandon Fail, serving his Morning Dew

Competitor: Aulden Morgan, serving the Peach Dandy

Competitor: Angie Stills, serving her Shuqualak Satsuma Slinger

Drumroll please . . . 

Congrats to the winner! – Aulden Morgan

And the winner is Aulden Morgan (Zocolo) with the Peach Dandy. Congrats!

Want more information about Slow Food?

That Just Happened!!
Robin Williams
Marketing Maven, Holiday Lanes

Stated travel intentions 

Vacation is on the horizon. So I have a few simple travel nuggets. 💡You are by no means obligated to follow them, but are welcome to if you like. So here are my stated intentions for the week:

  1. Have fun and be looking for fun. Share happiness & joy. Smile 😀 and laugh as much as possible, or at least until snot slings!
  2. Sing at the top of your lungs and to the best of your ability 🎶
  3. IMG_0750If you see something along the side of the road that is too hilarious to pass,💰 we must stop for pic (as shown). STOP!👀 SEE! and ENJOY!
  4. Stress only creates more stress, ⁉️ so don’t stress
  5. If you have prescribed meds, 💊💉don’t forget to take them. Nuf said. (If they are good meds, share them). Lol, JK, kinda
  6. look for adventure 🚡but don’t assume or force everyone to like to participate in your adventure.
  7. Leave all judgements behind 🙉🙈🐵 (i.e. no judging me if I snore, have bad breath, or show too much cellulite) HAHA.
  8. Be grateful for nature 🌾🌴🐠🌙💧and good company!
  9. If we get lost, embrace it as an adventure and don’t stress.🚗 🚊 🚡✈️
  10. Just love and allow love to come to you.🎌
  11. Clean up the seat for anything you left behind. 💩

Please feel free to add comments and suggestions.

That just happened.
Robin Williams

How many monster apples can you eat?

Boudreaux_rI have this really cool side job promoting The Chocolate Crocodile™ on social media. In case you haven’t heard about The Chocolate Crocodile, in which case I’m not doing an effective job, you need to know that it is the most fabulous candy/chocolate store around. They can dip anything (that’s legal). The Monster Croc Apple is their most popular specialty. More about that in a moment.

IMG_0318In 2005, Jim and Cyndi Ragon decided to leave their full time jobs in Minnesota, move to Bossier City, Louisiana and share their love for chocolate at the newly established Louisiana Boardwalk. Ten years later, they have opened two more stores: Cypress, Texas and Huntsville, Alabama. They are committed to bringing life´s goodness in an elegant, personal atmosphere. Their love extends by specializing in the finest chocolate and caramel delicacies covering the largest juiciest fruits and wrapped in the tastiest crunchiest nuts.

Here are some things you might not know, but should:

  • The Chocolate Crocodile™ uses only the finest chocolate to cover everything from apples to strawberries, peanut butter balls to twinkees, and anything between that you can dream. [If it’s legal – :)] If you don’t see it, they can custom dip it, just ask.
  • They make their caramel fresh, right in the store each day. Yes, homemade. It takes about three hours for each batch. That’s why it tastes so yummy.
  • choccroc4They dip approximately 1300 bushels of apples each year. That’s 83,200 APPLES!
  • In addition to their most popular Monster Croc Pecan Apple, they have 36 different varieties of dipped apples. Each start with a super sized Granny Smith Apple, homemade caramel and layers of chocolate, nuts, sprinkles or confections. (Consider trying the Margarita Apple).
  • Worried about how to eat a Monster Croc Apple? No worries, they will slice your apples so that you can dig right in. I’ve seen the knife, it’s big. Maybe machete is the better word.
  • 10906483_898323243541969_8634360711497633935_nLet’s talk strawberries and apple sizes. Have you seen them? Extra large may be an understatement. The Chocolate Crocodile™ special orders their strawberries and apples. Quality is very important to Jim and Cyndi. If they run out of the fruit, there will be no run to the corner grocery. The standards for consistency in size and quality are of the utmost importance.
  • IMG_6382The Chocolate Crocodile™ has chocolate tours available for groups. Jim, or one of the chocolatiers, will show you around the store, give you the history of chocolate and allow you to have a hands-on experience with dipping chocolate.
  • Are you a wine and chocolate lover? Well then you will want to book a Wine and Chocolate Experience at Jimmy’s Seafood & Steak inside the Margaritaville Resort Casino To book, contact Ashley Davis at 752-1455 or adavis@woodmont.com.
  • They even doggie treats. Their non-chocolate treats are specially formulated so don’t worry about ill effects to your dog.
  • And the last point that I’ll draw your attention to is that you can order The Chocolate Crocodile™ yummies from ANYWHERE! Yes, they have ONLINE ORDERING. Check it out.

Today, The Chocolate Crocodile™ appeared on the KTBS First News morning show to discuss the upcoming Monster Apple Eating Contest that will be held at the KTBS/KPXJ Independence Day Festival. On-air personalities, Rick Rowe and Brian Fowler took a shot at an early challenge.

Who do you think was the winner there?

So now, let’s talk about how many monster apples you can eat. Let’s find out on the 4th of July. Head down to the Independence Day Festival at Shreveport’s Festival Plaza. 2015_Choc_Croc_Apple_Eating_FlyerThe Monster Apple Eating Contest begins at 3 pm on the Community Stage, under the Farmer’s Market Pavilion near the train depot. Adults and children are encouraged to give it all they’ve got! You will have 7 minutes to eat all the Monster Croc Apples that you can. There will be cash prizes for 1st thru 3rd place for both adult and children categories. Holiday Lanes will provide water for the event and has provided game passes for anyone who signs up, along with prizes for the winners. My good friend Thomas at Maccentric has provided the apples for the event. (good fit, don’t ya think?)

Sign up online now and don’t forget to follow The Chocolate Crocodile™.

That just happened.
Robin Williams,
Marketing Maven at Holiday Lanes